queenelizabeth-jpg:

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

queenelizabeth-jpg:

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011

Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

(Source: boyirl)

interdome:

As part of her MA work at the Design Academy Eindhoven, artist and graphic designer Echo Yang created a series titled Autonomous Machines where common analog devices like tin windup toys, a Walkman, an alarm clock and other machines were connected to writing and painting instruments. As each machine was set loose on a canvas its specialized motions were translated into brush strokes, paint blobs, and pencil marks resulting in self-generated artworks somewhat reminiscent of spirographs. While conceptual artists have long been recording the actions of machines, plants, wind and other moving objects to generate artwork, Yang’s painting wind-up chicken toy stands out as a superbly executed idea. It would be great to see a whole series of those. You can see many more painting vacuum cleaners, hand mixers and electric razors on her website.

via Colossal

h/t to M

mainart:

Real windows framed as T.V screens (Project), 2014 Ibon Mainar

mainart:

Real windows framed as T.V screens (Project), 2014 Ibon Mainar

(Source: mainart)

prostheticknowledge:

WINNING

Game art project by Alex Myers reduces the FPS to it’s basic principle, shoot and kill, by placing armed players in a small intimate space - video embedded below:

Build a small room. Arm two players. Let them kill each other. Over and over and over and over and over. Call it “Winning.”

It examines the dynamic of popular First-Person Shooter videogames. By limiting the game space to a small room with two players, I’ve removed any overt reason to play the game in order to highlight the basic dynamic of violence. Both models, the terrorist and the counter-terrorist are wearing my smiling face, inverting the traditional place of a game avatar. It is not about fighting myself, but about about seeing myself and ourselves reflected in this perpetual cycle of violence and asking, “is this winning?”. If there are no human players, then the cycle is broken.

More about the project can be found here

agenerousdesigner:

Eiterquellen by Stefan Furtbauer is a free work on Viennese Wurstel Diners and the little different Viennese fast-food culture.

Most of the time these diners are isolated islands of food supply in an ancient surrounding with a dash of cultural heritage. Isolated both in the sense of appearance as well as in the sense of resisting against global operating fast-food chains. But the ‘improper’ and modern their architecture may appear, the much heritage there is behind the scenes.

Viennese wurstel diners have been introduced during the Austro-Hungarian “K.u.K.” Monarchy around 1870 to provide a safe income for wounded war veterans. Since then they became an essential part of the urban culture not by only supplying snacks but also being a meeting spot of the distinctive Viennese working class and the high society, too.

On top, the sub-urban Viennese tongue is a raw one and gets celebrated at exactly these places - a main reason I’ve chosen the title ‘Eiterquellen’ (‘Pus Springs’) for this project. The Viennese tongue has found some questionable synonyms for the food supplied at diners, like ‘Eitrige’ (‘pus-filled’) which describes a ‘Kaesekrainer’ sausage which is filled with cheese and when put on the grill the cheese melts and oozes out. With some imagination this can look like pus. Preferably the ‘Kaesekrainer’ is served with barf (mustard) and a hump (bread roll)…

Of course these ancient Viennese diners had to evolve to catch up with international fast-food chains, Kebap diners and Asian snack bars. They’ve refurbished appearance with contemporary architecture which is by the way not unfamiliar with the style of diners of the 60ies in the US. But they serve the same snacks they used to serve almost 150 years ago.

So this is how these wonderful, sometimes quirky places emerged which wrangle with the history though they’re part of the same.

(Source: devidsketchbook.com)

emergentfutures:

a tiny home that’s part wooden chestnut and part stained-glass cathedral
Designed and constructed by sixteen students, the OTIS (which stands for Optimal Traveling Independent Space) is an aerodynamic, pod-shaped design, made to be towed on a standard 5 by 8 foot trailer and a four-cylinder vehicle. It has its own rainwater collection system that feeds into the indoor plumbing, in addition to the 120-watt solar panel system to provide electricity. To handle human waste, the OTIS uses a composting toilet.


[source: Grist]

emergentfutures:

a tiny home that’s part wooden chestnut and part stained-glass cathedral

Designed and constructed by sixteen students, the OTIS (which stands for Optimal Traveling Independent Space) is an aerodynamic, pod-shaped design, made to be towed on a standard 5 by 8 foot trailer and a four-cylinder vehicle. It has its own rainwater collection system that feeds into the indoor plumbing, in addition to the 120-watt solar panel system to provide electricity. To handle human waste, the OTIS uses a composting toilet.

[source: Grist]

farewell-kingdom:

Sculptures carved from egg shells by Chinese artist Wen Fuliang